Posted in Uncategorized

Bookbike

I went to a session on outreach at the Wisconsin Association of Public Libraries (WAPL) Conference on May 4, 2018. One of the panelists spoke about their bookbike. This was from Eau Claire Public Library.

They take 75-100 books out at a time. They bring out some of their newest books on the bookbike so it’s like a lucky day collection for those checking out from the bookbike. They also try customizing their bookbike collection for the event they are attending. E.g. bring strawberry recipe/canning books to the farmers market on the bookbike during strawberry season.

Advice: think about where you are going to stash your bookbike collection in your library. Keep giveaways light and small.

Ran the bookbike purchase past risk management and they had two rules:

  1. Always go with two people
  2. Be back to the library before dark

Training is provided for staff including bike safety, hooking up the bike trailer, and circulation and setting up new library cards.

Bookbike has a handle so staff can roll it into indoor events.

The goal of the bookbike is about making connections, not about circulation. Going out with the bookbike is very casual and there is a lot of conversation.

If patrons don’t have a card the library staff will look them up in the ILS.

A few events the bookbike goes to include:

  • National Night Out
  • Farmers market 2x weekly
  • Block parties
  • Earth Day events
  • Concert series 1x weekly

If it rains, the bookbike doesn’t go out.

They recently got a trailer for the bookbike do they can take the bookbike out further distances and also go out to indoor events even if it’s raining.

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Posted in Uncategorized

Inquiry-Based STEM Programming

Program description: Transform your STEM programming with new approaches that encourage youth driven and connected learning. Using hands-on examples we’ll show you how to embed inquiry-based learning techniques into your programs. We’ll look at how you can align your STEM offerings with the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) and STEM pathways. Lastly, we’ll discuss outcomes and evaluating programs.

Presenters:

Renee Neumeier, Young Adult Services Supervisor
Evanston Public Library, Evanston, IL

Katie LaMantia, Teen Librarian
Schaumburg Township District Library, Schaumburg, IL

Janet Piehl, Youth Services Librarian
Wilmette Public Library, Wilmette, IL

Tyler Works, Youth Services Assistant Department Head
Indian Prairie Library, Darien, IL

Check out this Tinker blog that several of the presenters co-founded and co-facilitate.

Handouts: Handout, Slides

IMG_9891.JPG

My Notes:

Tinker: 20-60 staff get together and spend time with tinker tools. It’s hands-on with tinker tools and they bring in guest speakers.

Inquiry-based learning is wonder > explore > reflect/discuss. Instead of having the teacher in front of the classroom, the student is the center. The teacher is more of a facilitator and you and the student are learning together.

Why inquiry-based learning?

  • Gets kids excited about learning something new
  • Works for all ages and abilities – very approachable for everyone to use

The Next Generation Science Standards: what students do, know and think. Students don’t just decide they want to be an engineer or scientist, they need to do it or see themselves doing it.

Why should you do this in libraries? 

  • Connect with skills
  • Youth build on what they learned in school in a more relaxed setting
  • Reach kids with different backgrounds and learning styles. Meet them where they are at
  • Make learning connections to books
  • Libraries are not bound to a curriculum
  • Easier program planning
  • Librarians are good at asking questions. Questions are the driving force of inquiry-based programming

Program Model

  1. Wonder: the driving question
  2. Exploring: hands-on learning process. The library staff’s job is to facilitate
  3. Discuss/reflect: share what you’ve learned during this process

Talk Moves 

  • Can you say more about that?
  • What makes you think that?
  • What’s another way to do that?
  • Explain your thinking to me

Goals of Talk Moves

  • Share, expand, and clarify individual thinking
  • Meaningful, active listening
  • Deepen reasoning – ask, how did you arrive at that conclusion?
  • Think with others, push it a little bit further

Program Model in Action

Example: Icee Challenge (see Handout)

Wonder: How can we prevent brain freezes?

  • Showed a PBS video on brain freezes
  • Had a discussion on how we can prevent brain freezes
  • Come up with the faster you eat, the faster you’ll get a brain freeze. Led them to want to design a new cup/receptacle

Explore: Construct a better cup to prevent Icee from melting quickly.

  • Cleaned out supply cabinet for supplies
  • Library worked as the facilitator and used talk moves

Reflect: Share your design. What worked best?

  • If staff had planned this like a regular STEM program, they would have done a ton of research ahead of time. With inquiry-based STEM programming, there is much less pressure to plan. More about facilitating the creative process.

Evaluations and Outcomes

  • Program objectives are what learners can get out of it. All ties into real life stuff kids are interested in. e.g. Icee headaches
  • Helps kids with critical thinking skills
  • You don’t have to be an expert in this!
  • Continuum of service: you are re-enforcing what they are already learning in school
  • Take it out of your building, use it with kindergartners through 8th graders
Posted in Outreach, PLA Conference, Planning, Program

MakMo: The LA County Library’s MakerMobiles

I’m almost done blogging about PLA 2018! Here you will learn about LA County Library’s MakerMobiles.

Program Description: Want to offer STEM programming but don’t have room for a makerspace? Thinking about how your library can go mobile? Learn about LA County Library’s new MakMo makermobiles, which offer STEM and maker programming to 87 libraries and a service area spanning 3,000 square miles. Session highlights include detailed descriptions of the vehicle and equipment, lessons learned rolling out this new mobile, service, and sample maker programs to take back to your own library.

Presenters

Leticia Polizzi, Adult Services Manager
Palos Verdes Library District, Palos Verdes, CA

Jesse Walker-Lanz, Adult & Digital Services Administrator
County of Los Angeles Public Library, Los Angeles, CA

Handouts: 

PPT – MakMo, FactSheet – MakMo

My Notes:

Budget: The start-up budget total was $250,000 including vehicle, equipment and staffing.

Team: Get your procurement team/purchasing department on board right away

Vehicle: Patrons don’t go on the vehicles. Staff only go on to get materials. Maker activities happen outside of the vehicle.

Staffing: a library staff member drives the vehicle and doesn’t need a special license.

Equipment: kids can make stuff and take it home (make dos). Have Ozobots, 3D printing (very popular), circuits – Little Bits and Snap Circuits, robotics – Lego Mindstorms and Cubelets, building – KEVA planks (also great for de-stressing during exam week). See the factsheet for more equipment.

Community promotion: Created promo material to say the MakMo was coming. Also went to library grand openings with MakMo. See promo and schedule.

 

 

 

Posted in PLA Conference, Staff Training

HOW TO Supercharge your Staff Training in Four Easy Steps

Jeromy Wilson, CEO and Founder, Niche Academy HOW TO Supercharge your Staff Training in Four Easy Steps
Quickly learn how to increase staff productivity and morale in 4 immediately actionable steps. We’ll talk about motivators, simplifying the process, learning styles and more. You will walk away ready to implement or reinvigorate your library staff training.

I attended a 20-minute session on staff training at PLA. I missed the first couple of minutes but I think I caught most of the talk.

  1. Make it measurable. Add training to yearly goals.
  2. Disseminate: find a way to get info out there. Break info into chunks, like 5-minute segments. Offer a flexible learning environment or offer an online option. Offer a flexible timetable as people learn differently (visual, auditory, tactile). Do they learn better in a group or on their own?
  3. Calculate what is going on. Who has taken what and who understands the information? Offer quizzes. Talk to people-get feedback. Was the training helpful? Too much or too little? Really listen to what they need and then act on what you’ve learned.
  4. Ameliorate: make something bad, better. Take feedback and put it into action. Simplify and shorten sessions. Keep your PowerPoints fresh and update images/content.
Posted in Conference, Outreach, Staff Training

BookBike

I went to a session on outreach at the Wisconsin Association of Public Libraries (WAPL) Conference on May 4, 2018. One of the panelists spoke about their BookBike. This was presented by a staff person from the Eau Claire Public Library.

They take 75-100 books out at a time. They bring out some of their newest books on the BookBike so it’s like a lucky day collection for those checking out from the BookBike. They also try customizing their BookBike collection for the event they are attending. E.g. bring strawberry recipe/canning books to the farmers market on the BookBike during strawberry season.

Advice: think about where you are going to stash your BookBike collection in your library. Keep giveaways light and small.

Ran the BookBike purchase past risk management and they had two rules:

  1. Always go with two people
  2. Be back to the library before dark

Training is provided for staff including bike safety, hooking up the bike trailer, and circulation and setting up new library cards.

Bookbike has a handle so staff can roll it into indoor events.

The goal of the BookBike is about making connections, not about circulation. Going out with the BookBike is very casual and there is a lot of conversation.

If patrons don’t have a card the library staff will look them up in the ILS.

A few events the BookBike goes to include:

  • National Night Out
  • Farmer’s market 2x weekly
  • Block parties
  • Earth Day events
  • Concert series 1x weekly

If it rains, the BookBike doesn’t go out.

They recently got a trailer for the BookBike do they can take the BookBike out further distances and also go out to indoor events even if it’s raining

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Posted in Conference

Better Libraries and Stronger Communities through Kindness, Empathy, and Love

Keynote talk by Lance Werner, Kent District Library speaking at the Wisconsin Association of Public Libraries (WAPL) Annual Conference (May 3, 2018)

Lance Werner, Barry McKnight, Marge Loch WoutersLeft to right: Lance Werner, Barry McKnight, and Marge Loch-Wouters

I was doing my best to just listen but sometimes I was compelled to write stuff down. Here are my notes:

Lance says when you work at the library you are a public servant. He is a “humble champion of mushy stuff” because the mushy stuff matters. Lance says everybody and everything matters. “If you are a leader, you are just a head in the machine.”

Doing what’s right isn’t usually easy. When something starts getting easy, it’s time to push it to the next level. Strive to be uncomfortable.

Lance talked about losing his father when his dad was just 50. This resonated with me as I too lost a parent at the young age of 50. Lance says life is too short, do not wait. We have today. Each day is a gift.

Learn lessons from tough times. There is wisdom in loss and pain. Just make sure you are listening. Pay attention to the wisdom people pass on to you. They paid a lot for the wisdom through experience.

What amazon.com can’t take away from us is the interaction we have with people in the library.

You can do anything and be anything as long as you get steppin’. Lance warned us that he was about to swear and then he said, “Don’t be a chickenshit.”

He went on to say that kindness and love are required to work in libraries. At library conferences, we should be talking about how we touch people and lift them up.

Kindness does not equal weakness. You know that moldy strawberry in the pint? Get it out of there before it touches the rest. Lance expects his staff to be kind. There is no room for unkind in public service.

You spend more time with your colleagues than with your own family. Make it a nurturing place to work. Make people feel supported and that they matter.

We (library staff) are in the people business, not the book business.

At Kent District Library, they have what they call the “KDL Way,” a customer service philosophy.

Lance talked about the OCLC Voter Perception survey (learn more.) There was a big drop in % of people who said they would vote for the millage rate for libraries. We need to get out there and tell our story. Don’t rattle off percentages/numbers. Tell the story that happened at the library that made you want to cry. We spent two minutes sharing with our neighbor a story that moved us.

Lance said we need to move away from the “shhhh” stereotype and more to a “Hey!” (I’m approachable) type stereotype.

Posted in Early Literacy, Program

ECRR: Keeping Adults Engaged

I attended an Every Child Ready to Read (ECRR) mini-session, which was 20 minutes long.

Saroj Ghoting, Early Childhood Literacy Consultant ECRR Storytime Challenge: Encouraging Adult Engagement
Children can take their cues from their caring adults. Facilitating interactions between the children and their adults not only can make storytime more fun and engaging, but also lays a foundation for building literacy and learning together. Get some ideas, share your ideas, in this whirlwind session.

I am always game for hearing Saroj Ghoting, Early Childhood Literacy Consultant, speak. This session primarily focused on how to get adults engaged during storytime (and off of their phones). We want to keep adults engaged during storytime so that they will keep doing early literacy interaction at home.

A lot of the time, one of the main reasons parents come to storytime is to talk to other parents. A big way they learn about parenting is parent-to-parent.

  • Give the adults a role to play (not, Let’s do this together.). Every 2nd or 3rd item, think of ways to make it more interactive.
  • Nametags: give to children and then give them to the adults. If you don’t give name tags to anyone, okay, but if you are giving them to the kids, then give them to the adults, too. If you give the adults a name tag, it gives them the impression that they are part of it.
  • Sing, talk, read, write, play to the tune of Skip to My Lou.
  • How to make things you are already doing more interactive? Using the book Too Noisy! Give parents a part to play, “too noisy.”
  • Jump, Frog, Jump!: have kids jump, parents say “How did the frog get away?” a repetitive phrase
  • The Cow Loves Cookies: Parents say: “But the cow loves…. ” and the kids say: “Cookies!”
  • While turning pages, parents say “flip,” kids say “swish.” You don’t need to do it with every book.
  • Round: spot things in the room that around round
  • Hickory Dickory Dock: children as mice and parents as clock. Saroj said, “It’s hard to be on your phone and be a clock at the same time.” LOL 🙂
  • Yoga: Stories, Songs, and Stretches: Creating Playful Storytimes with Yoga and Movement by Katie Scherrer. Incorporate yoga into storytime. Many adults like yoga
  • Crafts: not one per child, one per person! Let the adults work on their own and they can make a perfect one. 🙂 Children and adults can have interaction with the craft/activity.
  • Boxes: use a box and pictures from discarded books as the sides of the box. These boxes can be used as conversation starters. I remember Saroj saying the person she learned this about has now gotten these down to a science and has made them so they are collapsible for storage. See image below.
  • Play a matching game with sounds. Rhyming kitten and mitten. See image below.
  • Think experiences. Experiences pull people together. Create a ride the train experience. Set up chairs, collect tickets, modeling talk around the experience. See image below.
  • Do It Yourself/Do It Together Storytime (Phoenix, AZ). Cards have suggestions. Check out http://www.earlylit.net/storytime-resources/
  • Sneak things in here and there and over time your storytimes will be more engaging
  • Audience comment: Offer a family evening storytime. Have people arrive 30 minutes before closing so they can pick up material and check it out. Then they stay for the story time after hours. People love after-hours events!